Monday Meditation: Healing

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

As a child, I was fascinated by the story of the four men who carried their paralyzed friend on a mat to Jesus because they believed that Jesus could heal him. Since a large crowd had gathered to hear Jesus that day, when the friends arrived at the house in Capernaum where Jesus was preaching, they could not get in the door. Unwilling to give up on their mission of mercy, the friends carefully carried their friends to the roof of the home and made a hole directly above Jesus.

I wonder how much debris fell on Jesus before he stopped preaching. I wonder what the homeowner said when he saw a mat being lowered by ropes through his new sunroof. I wonder what the paralyzed man was thinking when his mat came to rest on the floor in front of Jesus and he looked up into Jesus’ face.

What happens next is somewhat surprising: “When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralyzed man, ‘Son, your sins are forgiven.’” (Mark 2:2-5) When Jesus witnessed the faith of these friends – a faith that led them to go to great lengths to access healing for their friend – Jesus responded with mercy.

Interestingly, spiritual healing preceded physical healing. “Which is easier: to say to this paralyzed man, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say ‘Get up, take your mat and walk’? But I want you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.’ So Jesus said to the man, ‘I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home.’ The man got up, took his mat and walked out in full view of them all. This amazed everyone and they praised God saying, ‘We have never seen anything like this!’” (Mark 2:9-12)

Faith is one of the core values of The Next Door. Often our clients’ family and friends keep the faith long after our clients have given up hope that they might experience healing. They are the ones who call our Admissions Team and drive their loved ones to our door seeking help; they are the ones who pray for healing for their incarcerated mothers, sisters, daughters, and friends who are completing their sentences at the Correctional Release Center.

Where do you see yourself in this story? How have you helped a loved one access healing in the past? Who has helped you experience physical, mental, emotional, or spiritual healing? Who needs your help this week to receive the healing they seek?

Alcohol Awareness Month: Withdrawal

– Written by Vanderbilt School of Nursing Students

The Positive Effects of Quitting Alcohol  

Stopping and reducing your alcohol use has many positive effects on your body. This includes lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, and reducing your risk for heart failure and cancer. Quitting alcohol significantly increases life expectancy. Once you stop using alcohol, your liver has time to heal and restore itself. Alcohol cessation can also elevate your self esteem, decrease anxiety, and promote better sleep.

What is alcohol withdrawal?

After long term use of alcohol, your brain starts to adjust to the constant presence of alcohol in your system. Because alcohol is a central nervous depressant, your brain must work harder to communicate with your body when using alcohol. When alcohol use is suddenly stopped, or seriously cut back, the body experiences alcohol withdrawal. During withdrawal, your brain cannot adjust quickly enough to the removal of the depressant and continues to work in overdrive causing a potentially dangerous set of symptoms.

What does detox feel like?

Detox is the process of removing the substance out of the body. Symptoms typically develop within several hours to a few days of quitting and usually worsen after 48 to 72 hours. These symptoms include:

  • Cramps
  • Increases in heart rate
  • High Blood pressure
  • Hyper alertness
  • Jerky movements, tremors and shaking
  • Irritability
  • Easily startled
  • Vomiting

How detox can become a medical emergency

The medical emergency that can occur due to withdrawal from alcohol is called Delirium Tremens. Delirium Tremens can be deadly and should be managed with the help of medical professionals. Delirium peaks at 2 to 3 days after cessation of alcohol and lasts 2 to 3 days

Symptoms include:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Excessive Sweating
  • High blood pressure
  • Disorientation and Clouding of Consciousness
  • Seeing or Hearing Hallucinations
  • Extreme Mood Swings
  • Agitation
  • Delusions
  • High Grade Fever
  • Seizures

These symptoms can be severe, even deadly. If you have an alcohol use disorder or are worried about your alcohol use and want to quit, it is safest to find a treatment center that has a detox level of care so that you can detox safely.

Treatment for an Alcohol Use Disorder can significantly improve quality of life, but it’s not something anyone should go through alone. It can be made easier with support from places like The Next Door. If you or someone you love are thinking about quitting alcohol, please reach out to your provider or a facility such as The Next Door for emotional and medical support.

Ready to detox safely with help and support?

  • Call The Next Door at 855-863-4673

Looking for more information about alcohol addiction or withdrawal?

Experiencing a medical emergency related to alcohol withdrawal?

  • Call 911

Monday Meditation: Easter Sunday and Trauma

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

Although we tend to focus on rejoicing on Easter Sunday, the gospel narratives remind us that the first Easter Sunday was the culmination of three days of trauma, and trauma doesn’t simply evaporate. Three days prior to the discovery of the empty tomb, Jesus’ partners in ministry scattered in fear after his arrest in the Garden of Gethsemane. Afterwards, as Jesus predicted, Peter denied knowing Jesus three times. Consumed by shame, Judas – Jesus’ betrayer – died by suicide. A small group of women who had supported Jesus throughout his ministry followed Jesus all the way to the cross, bearing witness to his brutal execution. From the cross, Jesus called out to his friend John, instructing him to care for his mother Mary, who watched in horror as her firstborn son took his last breath. Unforgettable, horrific images were seared into their minds.

On Easter Sunday, when the grieving women went to the tomb bearing spices to anoint Jesus’ body, they were still reeling from all they had witnessed. Can you imagine the range of emotions they must have felt when they arrived at the tomb to find the stone rolled away and the body of their beloved Christ missing? More trauma. The women were terrified when angels suddenly appeared and asked them, “Why do you search for the living among the dead? Jesus isn’t here! He has risen from the dead?” How could they possibly process all they were experiencing?

Meanwhile, the remaining 11 apostles were huddled behind a locked door, fearful that they would be the next ones to be executed. They, too, were traumatized by the loss of their teacher and friend; their dream for a new kingdom of God on earth had been shattered. When the women arrived to pass on the angelic message of Christ’s resurrection, the men did not believe their story because they thought it sounded like nonsense. How did the women feel then? Two of the disciples were curious enough to check out the women’s story and discovered for themselves that the tomb was indeed empty. How did the men feel then? Even after Jesus finally mysteriously appeared in that locked room and revealed the wounds in hands and his side, the disciples’ joy and relief was tempered by the trauma they had experienced.

Yesterday as I led the Easter worship service at TND in Nashville, I was mindful of the trauma and grief present in the midst of our rejoicing. One client was marking the one-year anniversary of the death of her partner. Several were grieving the loss of loved ones in recent months. Others were desperately missing their children; some took comfort knowing they would soon see their children again while others grappled with the grim reality that they have permanently lost custody.

With this in mind, let us focus our prayers this week on clients and staff who are grieving and wrestling with traumatic events:

  • Those who are grieving the loss of loved ones
  • Those who are grieving the separation from their children – either temporarily or permanently
  • Those who are grieving missed opportunities, fractured relationships, and time lost due to addiction
  • Those who are grieving the countless losses and absences and unrealized dreams due to COVID-19
  • Those who have been traumatized by abuse
  • Those who have been traumatized by racial bias, ethnic discrimination, racism, and hate crimes

“Blessed be Abba God, the God of our Savior Jesus Christ, the Source of all mercies and the God of all consoling, who comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the same comforting God has given us.” 2 Corinthians 1:2-4

Monday Meditation: Do You See This Woman?

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

As The Next Door focuses on the core value of respect throughout 2021, we can turn to the Gospels and look to Jesus for inspiration. A story from Luke’s Gospel seems particularly relevant.

A religious leader had invited Jesus to be his honored guest for dinner. The meal was interrupted when a woman with bad reputation in the community entered the home uninvited. She was carrying a bottle of expensive perfume and weeping as she approached Jesus. With great humility, she knelt down and began to anoint Jesus’ feet, her tears mingling with the perfume on his skin. The host was astounded and offended by her actions, thinking to himself, “If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what kind of woman this is who is touching him—that she is a sinner” (Luke 7:39). Reading his host’s mind, Jesus told him a brief parable about a creditor and two debtors as a way of explaining that the woman’s actions reflected her deep gratitude for forgiveness.

Jesus contrasted his host’s failure to wash Jesus’ feet – an expected expression of hospitality – with the woman’s gesture of respect. “Do you see this woman? I entered your house; you gave me no water for my feet, but she has bathed my feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but from the time I came in she has not stopped kissing my feet. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. Therefore, I tell you, her sins, which were many, have been forgiven; hence she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little” (Luke 7:44-47).

Do you see this woman? Arguably, the religious leader did not truly see this woman. He had labeled the intruder as a sinner from the moment he laid eyes on her – someone who was less worthy than he was of Jesus’ attention and love. Jesus, on the other hand, truly saw this woman and welcomed her with love, treated her with respect, and blessed her for her actions.

Every woman who walks through our doors deserves to be welcomed with love and treated with respect without judgment. May our gratitude for the forgiveness and love that God and others have shown us fuel our desire to treat others with respect and compassion. Do you see this woman? May we learn to see each client with Jesus’ eyes.

 

Published on March 29, 2021

Monday Meditation: International Women’s Day

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

On International Women’s Day, the story of Ruth and Naomi seems fitting to contemplate. If you are unfamiliar with their story, the book of Ruth in the Old Testament is a compelling and quick read. Naomi, her husband, and their two sons left their home in Bethlehem because of a severe famine, leaving behind family and friends to become refugees in the land of Moab. While they were in Moab, Naomi’s husband died. Later, both of her sons married Moabite women. Tragically, both of her sons died in this foreign land, leaving three widows in this family. Grief upon grief upon grief.

After Naomi learned that the famine in her homeland had subsided, she decided to return to Bethlehem. When she announced her plan to her daughters-in-law, at first they both declared that they would accompany her. But Naomi argued that the young women should remain in their home country with their families, and she blessed them for the love they had shown her sons and her. One of her daughters-in-law opted to remain in Moab, but Ruth steadfastly refused: “Don’t ask me to leave you and turn back. Wherever you go, I will go; wherever you live, I will live. Your people will be my people, and your God will be my God. Wherever you die, I will die, and there I will be buried. May the Lord punish me severely if I allow anything but death to separate us!” (Ruth 1:15-17) That’s quite a commitment for a widowed daughter-in-law to make to her widowed mother-in-law.

As the narrative unfolds, these two grieving women learn to rely on each other as they chart a path into an uncertain future. They have each other; they don’t have to go it alone. I encourage you to read the rest of their story to see how God worked in and through their intertwined lives to bring hope and healing.

Think about the women who God has used to encourage, guide, and sustain you during difficult times. Perhaps during this season of Lent you could take on the practice of reaching out to these women to express your gratitude. As you seek to be a instrument of healing in others’ lives this week, remember those who have brought healing to your life and thank God for them.

Published on March 8, 2021

Healthy Hearts. Happy Women

– Written by Vanderbilt Nursing Students

February is American Heart Health Month

The best way to celebrate the month of love is to learn about the heart! Heart disease is the number 1 killer of women in the United States. Coronary Heart Disease, hypertension, and stroke fall under the umbrella term of heart disease.

Statistics

According to the CDC, heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, killing almost 300,000 women a year – 6 times the number of women who will die of breast cancer.

Heart disease is, for the most part, due to lifestyle factors with 90% of women having one or more risk factors.

The lack of education surrounding heart disease and its effects on women has led to poorer outcomes for women experiencing heart disease than men. Studies have shown that women are less likely to understand they are experiencing a heart attack than men due to differences in symptoms. Women are also less likely to seek treatment.

Women are also treated less aggressively than men following a diagnosis involving heart disease. In order to combat these differences, it is important for women to understand ways to prevent heart disease as well as to learn to identify when they may be experiencing a heart attack or symptoms of heart disease.

What is heart disease?

Heart disease is a group of problems that occur when the heart and blood vessels are not working the way they should. This can mean that the heart itself is not beating correctly or can be caused by plaque buildup in the arteries that supply oxygen to the heart muscle itself. This means that the heart cannot supply the body with the blood and oxygen it needs to function. Due to the lack of oxygen, other parts of the physical symptoms often manifest and signal to the person that something is not right.

How to live a heart-healthy lifestyle!

Quit Smoking: Smoking is a major cause of heart disease. Your risk of heart diseases increases the longer and the more you smoke. Female smokers have a higher risk of heart disease than male smokers. If you do smoke, “quiet lines” have been set up in every state to provide you with professional help for smoking cessation. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Eat a Heart-Healthy Diet: A heart-healthy diet is one of your best weapons to fighting heart disease. A heart-healthy diet focuses on vegetables, fruits, beans, and low-fat dairy products. It’s important to limit red meat, sugary foods and drinks, and sodium. A good way to start eating a heart-healthy diet is by cutting down fast food, which is full of fat, salt, and sugar.

Limit Use of Drugs and Alcohol: Use of drugs and alcohol may lead to adverse cardiovascular effects, such as increased blood pressure and buildup of plaques. Limiting (or eliminating) alcohol intake is a great way to take care of your heart.

Get Daily Exercise: Regular exercise strengthens your heart and promotes the health of your blood vessels. Try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise at least 5 days a week.

How to know if you are having a heart attack

The most common symptoms of heart attack are

  • chest pain
  • pressure or discomfort that lasts more than a few minutes or comes and goes
  • symptoms in women
    • shortness of breath
    • nausea/vomiting
    • neck, back, or jaw pain
    • abdominal discomfort
    • indigestion
    • unusual fatigue
    • lightheadedness or dizziness
    • sweating

Sources:

https://healthmetrics.heart.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/At-A-Glance-Heart-Disease-and-Stroke-Statistics-%E2%80%93-2019.pdf

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16537300/#:~:text=Women%20who%20experience%20symptoms%20of,the%20onset%20of%20initial%20symptoms.

https://www.acog.org/womens-health/faqs/heart-health-for-women

Monday Meditation: A New Look at Psalm 23

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

At least once a month, I lead a Spirituality in Recovery group focused on Psalm 23, perhaps the most famous of the 150 psalms included in Scripture. This psalm is frequently read aloud at funeral services because of this line: “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me.” When I discuss this psalm with clients, I frame it as an expression of delight in God. The author – believed to be David, the shepherd who became Israel’s second king – gratefully expounds upon the ways that God has demonstrated provision, protection, and compassion for him.

In her book Guide My Feet: Prayers and Meditations on Loving and Working for Children, Marian Wright Edelman includes a version of Psalm 23 that she heard at All Saints Convent in Catonville, Maryland. Entitled “The Nuns’ Twenty-Third Psalm,” this variation on Scripture speaks to our need for provision, protection, and compassion from God in our work at The Next Door.

The Lord is my pace-setter, I shall not rush.
He makes me stop and rest for quiet intervals;
He provides me with images of stillness, which restore my serenity.
He leads me in ways of efficiency through calmness of mind.
And His guidance is peace.
Even though I have a great many things to accomplish each day,
I will not fret, for his presence is here.
His timelessness, his all-importance will keep me in balance.
He prepares refreshment and renewal in the midst of my activity
By anointing my mind with His oils of tranquility.
My cup of joyous energy overflows.
Surely harmony and effectiveness shall be the fruit of my hours for
I shall walk in the place of my Lord and dwell in His House forever.

May you sense the loving presence of the Good Shepherd as you work this week.

Published on February 8, 2021

Monday Meditation: The Beatitudes

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

When Jesus sat down on a mountainside overlooking the Sea of Galilee to deliver what would come to be known as “The Sermon on the Mount,” I imagine that the women and men and children who gathered around him leaned forward, straining to hear his provocative words. The opening passage of this sermon is called “The Beatitudes” – a list of blessings. Jesus’ litany of those who are blessed is somewhat surprising. For example, how can those who are mourning be considered to be blessed? And yet, upon closer inspection, we can see a pattern in Jesus’ words.

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.
Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.
Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.
Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. (Matthew 5:3-10)

The poor in spirit are those who have learned that they must rely on God in all circumstances. Those who mourn depend on God to sustain them as they move forward into a future without the companionship of their dearly departed ones. The meek are not people who are weak; they are those who approach God and others with humility. Those who hunger and thirst for righteousness trust God to guide their lives, to direct their paths. Those who are merciful demonstrate Christ-like compassion for others. Those who are pure in heart manifest integrity – there is no differentiation between their public life and their private one. Those who are peacemakers desire to live in harmony with God and others. Those who are persecuted for doing what is right take comfort in knowing that they do not walk alone on the path of righteousness.

Do you see the connection – the thread running through all of the blessings? Jesus does not equate blessing with fame or fortune. Blessing flows from an individual’s intimate relationship with God, from an individual’s dependence on God.

Jesus’ words remind me to look for blessings in unexpected places, in unanticipated ways. May you experience the blessing of God this week

Monday Meditation: “The Hill We Climb”

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

I can’t get her words out of mind. Last Wednesday, 22-year-old Amanda Gorman burst into the world’s collective consciousness as she recited her poem “The Hill We Climb” on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. Gorman began and ended her poem with references to light.

In the opening line of her poem, Gorman poses a timely question:

“When day comes we ask ourselves,

where can we find light in this never-ending shade?”

The word “dark” has been used repeatedly to use to describe the historical period in which we are living. Where can we find light in these dark days?

Amanda Gorman answers her own question in the closing lines of her poem:

“For there is always light,

if only we’re brave enough to see it.

If only we’re brave enough to be it.”

 

Poet June Jordan would agree with Amanda Gorman. In her “Poem for South African Women,” Jordan declared: “We are the ones we have been waiting for.”

We are called to be the light. Jesus declared this in his Sermon on the Mount: “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.” (Matthew 5:14-16)

Let your light shine, Jesus said. How do we do this? By remaining connected to One who is the source of all light. The psalmist wrote, “You, Lord, keep my lamp burning; my God turns my darkness into light.” (Psalm 18:28) We do not have to draw from our own limited resources to be light in the world; instead, we can allow the power of God to flow through us. With God’s help, we can illuminate the darkness. With God’s help, we can be light for women who are searching for a way out of the darkness where they have dwelled for far too long. With God’s help, we can be bearers of the light for one another on those dark days when we can’t see the way forward.

To be light in the world requires courage and connection. May Amanda Gorman’s words be true of us in our work on behalf of women and their families at The Next Door:

“Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true,
Even as we grieved, we grew,
Even as we hurt, we hoped,
Even as we tired, we tried.”

photo from politico.com

Published on January 25, 2021

Monday Meditation: Celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

– Written by Rev. Tambi Swiney

Today our nation celebrates the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. On this day of remembrance for a man and the justice movement he gave his life for, people often recall the words Dr. King spoke on April 3, 1968, to a crowd of striking sanitation workers in Memphis. Many of us are familiar with the closing lines of Dr. King’s final speech, delivered on the day before he was assassinated:

We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn’t matter with me now. Because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land. And I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.”

Many people don’t know that in this speech Dr. King referenced one of Jesus’ most famous stories: the parable of the Good Samaritan. This story, recorded in Luke 10:25-37, focuses on the responses of three men as they encounter another man in crisis. Jesus told this story in response to a lawyer’s question: “Who is my neighbor?”

When a priest saw the man who had been beaten and robbed and left for dead along the road to Jericho, he assessed the situation and chose not to act, passing by on the other side of the road. When a Levite (another religious leader) saw the wounded man, he likewise chose not to help, passing by on the other side. But when a Samaritan man saw the injured man, he displayed compassion, tending to the man’s wounds, taking the man to an inn where he could recuperate, pledging to pay for all expenses the innkeeper incurred as he cared for the man. At the conclusion of the story, Jesus asked the lawyer, “Which of these was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” The lawyer replied, “The one who had mercy on him.” Jesus responded, “Go and do likewise.”

Many people have speculated about why the priest and the Levite chose to ignore the one who was suffering on the road to Jericho. Some have postulated that the priest and the Levite were adhering to religious purity laws, but these laws did not prevent people from rendering aid in emergencies. In his final speech, Dr. King suggested that the priest and the Levite chose not to help because they were afraid of what might happen to them. Were the robbers still lurking nearby? Was this man faking injuries to lure them into a trap? Would they be attacked and robbed if they stopped to help?

Dr. King asserts that the questions that the three passersby asked when they encountered the injured man were intrinsically different. The priest and the Levite asked, “If I stopped to help this man in need, what will happen to me?” The Samaritan reversed the question: “If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?” (https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/ive-been-mountaintop-address-delivered-bishop-charles-mason-temple)

At The Next Door, we function more like the innkeeper in the parable. People in need are brought to us for healing or come to us on their own seeking help. But we live in a wider world where we must make decisions about whether will choose to engage with our neighbors who are suffering. Do we count the cost and choose to pass by on the other side, ignoring their suffering? Or will we choose to take responsibility for the welfare of our neighbors, lending aid as best we can to those who have been marginalized, those who are wounded and weary? If we do not stop to help, what will happen to our neighbors?

May we show mercy to our clients at The Next Door and to our neighbors in need beyond these doors, today and always.

Published on January 18, 2021